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Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Sociology is the study of individuals and groups in patterned behaviors. We study social processes and social institutions in areas such as the family, education, health, social inequality, immigration and race and ethnic relations, paid and unpaid work and politics. The goal of sociology is to help explain the relationship between our personal experiences and the wider organization of society.

B.A.Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Sociology is the study of individuals and groups in patterned behaviors. We study social processes and social institutions in areas such as the family, education, health, social inequality, immigration and race and ethnic relations, paid and unpaid work and politics. The goal of sociology is to help explain the relationship between our personal experiences and the wider organization of society.

Students graduate from our programs with the academic knowledge, research and work-related skills that equip them to adapt and successfully deal with the demands and challenges of everyday life. Sociology students learn to be reflective thinkers, practicing problem-solving and critical thinking skills commonly sought by employers.

The strong research agenda of the Sociology department leads to excellence in the classroom, translating into current and engaging topics for study with a sound theoretical foundation. Students praise faculty for being approachable and appreciate the high quality of instruction they receive at McMaster.

90 units total (Levels I to III), of which 42 units may be Level I.

 

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program

6 units

3 units

9 units

  • Level II Sociology

6 units

  • Level III Sociology

36 units

  • Electives, of which no more than 12 units may be from Sociology (the maximum Sociology courses to be taken is 36 units)

Students start in the Social Sciences Level 1 program and apply to the Sociology BA Program at the end of their first year. Students must complete the requirements of a Level I program including one of the specified Level I Sociology courses.

Completion of any Level I program with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.5 (C-) including a grade of at least 3.5 (C-) in SOCIOL 1Z03 or (SOCIOL 1A06 A/B).

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Sociology Awards

Excerpt from Undergraduate Calendar Award Pages

(B) = awards for full-time in-course students

(C) = awards for part-time, in course students

(E) = Awards for Graduating Students

(G) = Academic Grants 

The Frank E. Jones Prize (SS)

Established in 1982 in honour of Professor F.E. Jones for his outstanding contributions to the Department of Sociology. To be awarded to the full-time student with the highest Cumulative Average in an Honours program in Sociology.

Value: $100 (50020) (E)

 

The Betty MacMillan Prize (SS)

Established in 1960 by her classmates in memory of Elizabeth Johnstone MacMillan (Class of '50). To be awarded to the student who has completed Level I and 60 to 75 units in an Honours program in Sociology and who, in the judgment of the Department of Sociology, is the most promising student.

Value: $150 (30010) (B)

 

The Lianne Marks Scholarship (SS)

Established by her family, in 1980 as a bursary and in 1985 as a scholarship, in honour of Lianne Marks, a student at McMaster University (1977-80). To be awarded to a student who has completed Level I and 60 to 75 units of an Honours program in Sociology and who, in the judgment of the Department of Sociology, has demonstrated outstanding academic achievement and has made notable contribution to the campus or community by participation in activities other than sports.

Value: $800 (30100 102) (B)

Students who wish to be considered for this award are encouraged to submit a resume to the Department of Sociology by April 15th.

 

The McMaster Amicus Academic Grant in Sociology (SS)

Established in 2014 by a Bachelor of Arts alumnus (Class of ‘85). To be granted to a student who has completed at least Level II of a Sociology program with a high Fall/Winter Average and who demonstrates financial need.

Value: $1000 (85070) (G)

 

The Jack Richardson Memorial Scholarship (SS)

Established in 2002 in memory of Jack Richardson by family, friends and colleagues. To be awarded to a part-time student who has completed at least Level II in an Honours Sociology program and who attains the highest Cumulative Average at the most recent review.

Value: $400 (60013) (C)

 

The Sociology Prizes (SS)

Established in 1982. Two prizes to be awarded to students with the highest Cumulative Averages: (a) one to a student who has completed the three-level program in Sociology on a full-time basis; and (b) one to a student who has completed a program in Sociology primarily on a part-time basis.

Value: $100 each (50051) (E)

 

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

Level I, II and III Course List

• SOCIOL 1C03 - Canadian Society: Social Problems, Social Policy, and the Law
• SOCIOL 1Z03 - An Introduction to Sociology
• SOCIOL 2BB3 - Sociology of Deviance
• SOCIOL 2CC3 - Constructing Deviance
• SOCIOL 2DD3 - Immigration and the Canadian Mosaic
• SOCIOL 2EE3 - Introduction to Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada
• SOCIOL 2FF3 - The Sociology of 'Race' and Ethnicity
• SOCIOL 2GG3 - Sociology of Education
• SOCIOL 2HH3 - Sociology of Gender
• SOCIOL 2I03 - Sociology of Organizations
• SOCIOL 2JJ3 - Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
• SOCIOL 2KK3 - Introduction to Classical Sociological Theory
• SOCIOL 2L03 - Media Institutions
• SOCIOL 2LL3 - Introduction to Contemporary Sociological Theory
• SOCIOL 2PP3 - Sociology of Families
• SOCIOL 2QQ3 - Dynamics and Transitions in Intimate Relationships and Families
• SOCIOL 2R03 - Perspectives on Social Inequality
• SOCIOL 2RR3 - Case Studies of Social Inequality
• SOCIOL 2SS3 - Sociology of Work and Occupations
• SOCIOL 2T03 - Sociology of Sport
• SOCIOL 2TA3 - Islam In North America
• SOCIOL 2TT3 - Environmental Sociology
• SOCIOL 2UU3 - Indigenous Ontologies and Ways of Knowing
• SOCIOL 2Z03 - Introduction to Sociological Research
• SOCIOL 3A03 - Advanced Analysis of Classical Sociological Theory
• SOCIOL 3B03 - Selected Topics in the Sociology of Education
• SOCIOL 3C03 - Media and Social Issues
• SOCIOL 3CC3 - Sociology of the Family and the Life Cycle
• SOCIOL 3D03 - Special Topics in the Sociology of the Family
• SOCIOL 3FF3 - Introductory Statistics for Sociology
• SOCIOL 3G03 - Sociology of Health Care
• SOCIOL 3GG3 - Special Topics in the Sociology of Deviance
• SOCIOL 3HH3 - Sociology of Health
• SOCIOL 3J03 - Special Topics in Sociological Analysis I
• SOCIOL 3K03 - Special Topics in Sociological Analysis II
• SOCIOL 3KK3 - Genocide: Sociological and Political Perspectives
• SOCIOL 3MM3 - Political Sociology
• SOCIOL 3NN3 - Popular Culture and Inequality
• SOCIOL 3O03 - Qualitative Research Methods
• SOCIOL 3P03 - Advanced Analysis of Contemporary Sociological Theory
• SOCIOL 3U03 - Sociology of Sexualities
• SOCIOL 3W03 - Historical Methods in Sociology
• SOCIOL 3X03 - Sociology of Aging
• SOCIOL 3Z03 - Ethnic Relations

2018/2019 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses Apply Now
For more information:
General Sociology Inquiries
Kenneth Taylor Hall (KTH), Room 627
905-525-9140 ext. 24481
sociology@mcmaster.ca
Length:
3 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level I program with a Grade Point Average of at least 3.5 (C-) including a grade of at least 3.5 (C-) in SOCIOL 1Z03 or (SOCIOL 1A06 A/B).
Program Type:
Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September