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Sociology of Family

Most of us are embedded in family relationships, whether it is in our families of origin or in our current relationships. Although every relationship is unique, and every family is unique, one of the most exciting things about sociology is that it can help us to better understand and contextualize our own experiences. Sociology allows us to connect our personal experiences to a broader social context and to understand the historical, social, economic, political, and legal forces that shape family life. Sociological research illuminates how personal choices and individual destinies are constrained by larger social forces. The course will provide you with the tools to critically evaluate ‘common-sense’ understandings of the family and political debates surrounding contemporary family life, which are all too often rooted in myth and assumption rather than evidence. We will address sociological research on a number of issues including historical and cross-cultural perspectives on family life, parenthood, divorce, family violence, contemporary trends in family life, and diversity in families. The course aims to develop important academic skills including library research, effective writing, critical thinking, and active reading.

SOCIOL 2U06

Sociology of Family

Unit(s): 6.0 Level(s): II Term(s): Full Year Offered?: Yes

Most of us are embedded in family relationships, whether it is in our families of origin or in our current relationships. Although every relationship is unique, and every family is unique, one of the most exciting things about sociology is that it can help us to better understand and contextualize our own experiences. Sociology allows us to connect our personal experiences to a broader social context and to understand the historical, social, economic, political, and legal forces that shape family life. Sociological research illuminates how personal choices and individual destinies are constrained by larger social forces. The course will provide you with the tools to critically evaluate ‘common-sense’ understandings of the family and political debates surrounding contemporary family life, which are all too often rooted in myth and assumption rather than evidence. We will address sociological research on a number of issues including historical and cross-cultural perspectives on family life, parenthood, divorce, family violence, contemporary trends in family life, and diversity in families. The course aims to develop important academic skills including library research, effective writing, critical thinking, and active reading.


Sandra Colavecchia

Teaching Track Assistant Professor

Prerequisite(s): SOCIOL 1A06 Priority will be given to students registered in a Sociology program.