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Racial and Ethnic Group Relations

This course will focus on the ways in which ethnic relations have been theorized sociologically from a variety of scholars. Issues around race, ethnicity and ethnic relations raise a great deal of debate, and at times discomfort. I hope in this course we are able to collectively come to a critical understanding of race, ethnicity and ethnic relations and how these identities impact our connections to each other and to the larger nation / national identity. We will examine how race and ethnicity differ, and how they are linked in an understanding of the social environment. Writings on race and ethnicity reveal the ways in which racial and ethnic identities emerge from the interplay of macro-historical forces. The course asks how the historical context, characterized by industrialization, urbanization, colonization, imperialism, transnationalism, globalization, to list a few, has shaped the understanding of ethnic relations? The course will shed light on intergroup relations within the Canadian context, and how groups construct their racial and ethnic identities in relations to others in society, particularly in light of changing immigration trends. We will examine the ways in which ethnic and racial identities are socially reproduced, transformed and re-interpreted both historically and contemporarily. The course will also examine how race and ethnic difference are related to social inequality in Canada. Situated within an intersectionalist perspective, the course will examine how ethnic relations intersect with gender, sexuality, and class to influence the social positioning and conditioning of groups. Institutional responses to social inequality reveal that indeed race and ethnicity do matter in the lived experience of Canadians. We will conclude by looking at recent scholarship in the area which allows us to re-think race, ethnicity and ethnic relations and its relevance in contemporary Canadian society.

SOCIOL 2E06

Racial and Ethnic Group Relations

Unit(s): 6.0 Level(s): II Term(s): Full Year Offered?: Yes

This course will focus on the ways in which ethnic relations have been theorized sociologically from a variety of scholars. Issues around race, ethnicity and ethnic relations raise a great deal of debate, and at times discomfort. I hope in this course we are able to collectively come to a critical understanding of race, ethnicity and ethnic relations and how these identities impact our connections to each other and to the larger nation / national identity. We will examine how race and ethnicity differ, and how they are linked in an understanding of the social environment. Writings on race and ethnicity reveal the ways in which racial and ethnic identities emerge from the interplay of macro-historical forces. The course asks how the historical context, characterized by industrialization, urbanization, colonization, imperialism, transnationalism, globalization, to list a few, has shaped the understanding of ethnic relations? The course will shed light on intergroup relations within the Canadian context, and how groups construct their racial and ethnic identities in relations to others in society, particularly in light of changing immigration trends. We will examine the ways in which ethnic and racial identities are socially reproduced, transformed and re-interpreted both historically and contemporarily. The course will also examine how race and ethnic difference are related to social inequality in Canada. Situated within an intersectionalist perspective, the course will examine how ethnic relations intersect with gender, sexuality, and class to influence the social positioning and conditioning of groups. Institutional responses to social inequality reveal that indeed race and ethnicity do matter in the lived experience of Canadians. We will conclude by looking at recent scholarship in the area which allows us to re-think race, ethnicity and ethnic relations and its relevance in contemporary Canadian society.


Prerequisite(s): SOCIOL 1A06